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<h1>How To Keep Believing in the Internet</h1>
<h2><a href="https://jenmyers.net/daily/how-to-keep-believing-in-the-internet.html">Source originale du contenu</a></h2>
<p>About three weeks into the new year, I figured out that my personal internet was too loud. By “personal internet,” I mean my regular round of Twitter, websites and other social media. I don’t consume as much online as some people do, or even as much as I used to myself, and for a long time, this had me convinced that my time on the internet was harmless and not worth examining. Until I did examine it. And ended up taking a month’s vacation from much of it.</p>

<p>As someone who has long worked in the tech industry and was an early adopter of every form of social media, I’ve had to spend the past few years scaling back my internet usage. I first hit a wall with Twitter about five years ago; I subsequently unfollowed everyone and slowly, judiciously re-followed. About two years ago, I cleared out my Tumblr and logged out of my account. I gave up on Facebook and deactivated my account; after a year of not missing it much, I finally permanently deleted my account. I kept Instagram, but had no compunctions about dropping any account that bothered me in the least and filled my feed with pets. I’m not much attached to my phone, but I took steps to make sure I was actively de-tethered from it, such as buying an actual alarm clock so I can keep my phone on my desk at night. I also started to pay better attention to issues of security: I took several years’ worth of early social media posts offline and audited my internet properties to make sure everything out there was something I wanted to be out there.</p>

<p>My strategies worked. The more time I freed from the internet, the more time I had for books and films, which I valued more. I felt that when I put content out into the digital world, it was deliberate, thoughtful and sincere, rather than reflexive, careless or performative. Overall, I was less anxious and more contemplative. I felt better. But, every once and a while, I still get sunk in a compulsive habit of checking for new content and sucking it all in without a protective filter or a definite end. Which does not make me feel better. It’s like eating junk food: easy and momentarily satisfying, but regrettable later. And, at this point, it primarily circles around one service: Twitter.</p>

<p>I’ve been on Twitter for thirteen years. That’s a long time by any measure, and in internet terms, it feels like forever. I enjoy Twitter. There are a lot of smart and funny people there and I’ve learned a lot of new things over the years. I follow many folks who make cool stuff and talk about it on Twitter. Other fine folks follow me and give me valuable feedback on the stuff I make. The problem on Twitter arises for me not in quality but in volume. There’s just constantly too much. There’s not enough time to take it all in and even if there were, there wouldn’t be enough time to consider it anything more than superficially. What I’ve found is that after a long period of exposure, Twitter gradually, stealthily turns toxic to me. It gets too loud. And once it reaches that knife edge, it can go from useless to harmful in a snap.</p>

<p>I hit this point in mid-January. I realized that being hooked into the internet without pause was making me frustrated and short-tempered. So I took evasive action. I paused my weekly newsletter, which I have sent out for over five years, and I logged out of Twitter entirely, for the longest time since I first created my account. As of now, it’s been almost four weeks. And, lo and behold, I feel much better. Which is great in the short term, but has led me to start questioning: what do I do differently when I go back? Should I go back at all? Is it possible to use the internet these days with enough awareness and responsibility that it’s a net benefit?</p>

<p>Social media is not inherently bad. Twitter is not inherently bad. The internet is not inherently bad. In fact, I believe profoundly in the internet. I still believe that a mechanism that gets more information to more individuals is fundamentally a good thing. Not without its complications and challenges, of course, but a good thing nonetheless. I don’t as wholeheartedly believe in social media, but that is mostly because social media has evolved to oppose the internet’s original openness and democratization. Facebook is a walled garden that privileges access to information for Facebook users. (Fun experiment: log out of Facebook and try to read something “publicly” posted there. Their various popups do everything they can to impede your progress until you log in or create an account.) Instagram refuses links to external websites, the single most essential aspect of an interconnected web. Twitter has popularized long, threaded statements that we once published on our own websites and is now content Twitter can control. Every social media app has consciously adopted behaviors that make it virtually impossible to put it down: automatic loading of new content, endless scrolling and no ways out. The internet was supposed to be a tool for us to open our communication and expand our world. Now the experience of using it is nothing but a series of closed circuits designed by people who want to use us instead.</p>

<p>I realize none of this is a revelation. We know by now that too much internet, one way or another, is not healthy for us, and that the internet as it is now is riddled with more pitfalls than opportunities. It took longer for me, who came of age in the age of glorious internet optimism, to admit it. It has taken even longer for me to figure out how to deal with it.</p>

<p>I can’t do much to change the situation on a large scale. But this is what I will do. I will limit my internet intake and pay attention when it starts making me irritable or depressed. I will be deliberate in the messages I put out on the internet. When I write my email newsletters, I’ll mean them. I’ll post my own thoughts on my own website, whether or not anyone takes the time to read them. And I’ll keep believing in this imperfect tool as a way to connect with other people, open their communication and expand their world. Sometimes, I will have to take breaks. But it’s not because I hate the internet. It’s because that’s the only way to keep believing in it.</p>
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title: How To Keep Believing in the Internet
url: https://jenmyers.net/daily/how-to-keep-believing-in-the-internet.html
hash_url: 10a0e890ada0487e0adf4548960f056f

<p>About three weeks into the new year, I figured out that my personal internet was too loud. By “personal internet,” I mean my regular round of Twitter, websites and other social media. I don’t consume as much online as some people do, or even as much as I used to myself, and for a long time, this had me convinced that my time on the internet was harmless and not worth examining. Until I did examine it. And ended up taking a month’s vacation from much of it.</p>



<p>As someone who has long worked in the tech industry and was an early adopter of every form of social media, I’ve had to spend the past few years scaling back my internet usage. I first hit a wall with Twitter about five years ago; I subsequently unfollowed everyone and slowly, judiciously re-followed. About two years ago, I cleared out my Tumblr and logged out of my account. I gave up on Facebook and deactivated my account; after a year of not missing it much, I finally permanently deleted my account. I kept Instagram, but had no compunctions about dropping any account that bothered me in the least and filled my feed with pets. I’m not much attached to my phone, but I took steps to make sure I was actively de-tethered from it, such as buying an actual alarm clock so I can keep my phone on my desk at night. I also started to pay better attention to issues of security: I took several years’ worth of early social media posts offline and audited my internet properties to make sure everything out there was something I wanted to be out there.</p>

<p>My strategies worked. The more time I freed from the internet, the more time I had for books and films, which I valued more. I felt that when I put content out into the digital world, it was deliberate, thoughtful and sincere, rather than reflexive, careless or performative. Overall, I was less anxious and more contemplative. I felt better. But, every once and a while, I still get sunk in a compulsive habit of checking for new content and sucking it all in without a protective filter or a definite end. Which does not make me feel better. It’s like eating junk food: easy and momentarily satisfying, but regrettable later. And, at this point, it primarily circles around one service: Twitter.</p>

<p>I’ve been on Twitter for thirteen years. That’s a long time by any measure, and in internet terms, it feels like forever. I enjoy Twitter. There are a lot of smart and funny people there and I’ve learned a lot of new things over the years. I follow many folks who make cool stuff and talk about it on Twitter. Other fine folks follow me and give me valuable feedback on the stuff I make. The problem on Twitter arises for me not in quality but in volume. There’s just constantly too much. There’s not enough time to take it all in and even if there were, there wouldn’t be enough time to consider it anything more than superficially. What I’ve found is that after a long period of exposure, Twitter gradually, stealthily turns toxic to me. It gets too loud. And once it reaches that knife edge, it can go from useless to harmful in a snap.</p>

<p>I hit this point in mid-January. I realized that being hooked into the internet without pause was making me frustrated and short-tempered. So I took evasive action. I paused my weekly newsletter, which I have sent out for over five years, and I logged out of Twitter entirely, for the longest time since I first created my account. As of now, it’s been almost four weeks. And, lo and behold, I feel much better. Which is great in the short term, but has led me to start questioning: what do I do differently when I go back? Should I go back at all? Is it possible to use the internet these days with enough awareness and responsibility that it’s a net benefit?</p>

<p>Social media is not inherently bad. Twitter is not inherently bad. The internet is not inherently bad. In fact, I believe profoundly in the internet. I still believe that a mechanism that gets more information to more individuals is fundamentally a good thing. Not without its complications and challenges, of course, but a good thing nonetheless. I don’t as wholeheartedly believe in social media, but that is mostly because social media has evolved to oppose the internet’s original openness and democratization. Facebook is a walled garden that privileges access to information for Facebook users. (Fun experiment: log out of Facebook and try to read something “publicly” posted there. Their various popups do everything they can to impede your progress until you log in or create an account.) Instagram refuses links to external websites, the single most essential aspect of an interconnected web. Twitter has popularized long, threaded statements that we once published on our own websites and is now content Twitter can control. Every social media app has consciously adopted behaviors that make it virtually impossible to put it down: automatic loading of new content, endless scrolling and no ways out. The internet was supposed to be a tool for us to open our communication and expand our world. Now the experience of using it is nothing but a series of closed circuits designed by people who want to use us instead.</p>

<p>I realize none of this is a revelation. We know by now that too much internet, one way or another, is not healthy for us, and that the internet as it is now is riddled with more pitfalls than opportunities. It took longer for me, who came of age in the age of glorious internet optimism, to admit it. It has taken even longer for me to figure out how to deal with it.</p>

<p>I can’t do much to change the situation on a large scale. But this is what I will do. I will limit my internet intake and pay attention when it starts making me irritable or depressed. I will be deliberate in the messages I put out on the internet. When I write my email newsletters, I’ll mean them. I’ll post my own thoughts on my own website, whether or not anyone takes the time to read them. And I’ll keep believing in this imperfect tool as a way to connect with other people, open their communication and expand their world. Sometimes, I will have to take breaks. But it’s not because I hate the internet. It’s because that’s the only way to keep believing in it.</p>

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<article>
<h1>Working remotely builds organizational resiliency</h1>
<h2><a href="https://m.signalvnoise.com/working-remotely-builds-organizational-resiliency/">Source originale du contenu</a></h2>
<p>For many, moving from everyone’s-working-from-the-office to everyone’s-working-at-home isn’t so much a transition as it is a <em>scramble</em>. A very <em>how the fuck?</em> moment.</p>

<p>That’s natural. And people need time to figure it out. So if you’re in a leadership position, bake in time. You can’t expect people to hit the ground running when everything’s different. Yes, the scheduled show must go on, but for now it’s live TV and it’s running long. Everything else is bumped out.</p>

<p>This also isn’t a time to try to simulate the office. Working from home is not working from the office. Working remotely is not working locally. Don’t try to make one the other. If you have meetings all day at the office, don’t simply simulate those meetings via video. This is an opportunity <em>not</em> to have those meetings. Write it up instead, disseminate the information that way. Let people absorb it on their own time. Protect their time and attention. <a href="https://basecamp.com/guides/how-we-communicate">Improve the way you communicate</a>.</p>

<p>Ultimately this major upheaval is an <em>opportunity</em>. This is a chance for your company, your teams, and individuals to learn a new skill. Working remotely is a skill. When this is all over, everyone should have a new skill.</p>

<p>Being able to do <em>the same work in a different way</em> is a skill. Being able to take two paths instead of one builds <em>resiliency</em>. Resiliency is a super power. Being more adaptable is valuable.</p>

<p>This is a chance for companies to become more resilient. To build freedom from worry. Freedom from worry that without an office, without those daily meetings, without all that face-to-face that the show can’t go on. Or that it can’t work as well. Get remote right, build this new resiliency, and not only can remote work work, it’ll prove to work <em>better</em> than the way you worked before.</p>
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cache/2020/5c374b4df521b1ef44c86cd9a3cc022f/index.md View File

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title: Working remotely builds organizational resiliency
url: https://m.signalvnoise.com/working-remotely-builds-organizational-resiliency/
hash_url: 5c374b4df521b1ef44c86cd9a3cc022f

<p>For many, moving from everyone’s-working-from-the-office to everyone’s-working-at-home isn’t so much a transition as it is a <em>scramble</em>. A very <em>how the fuck?</em> moment.</p>



<p>That’s natural. And people need time to figure it out. So if you’re in a leadership position, bake in time. You can’t expect people to hit the ground running when everything’s different. Yes, the scheduled show must go on, but for now it’s live TV and it’s running long. Everything else is bumped out.</p>



<p>This also isn’t a time to try to simulate the office. Working from home is not working from the office. Working remotely is not working locally. Don’t try to make one the other. If you have meetings all day at the office, don’t simply simulate those meetings via video. This is an opportunity <em>not</em> to have those meetings. Write it up instead, disseminate the information that way. Let people absorb it on their own time. Protect their time and attention. <a href="https://basecamp.com/guides/how-we-communicate">Improve the way you communicate</a>.</p>



<p>Ultimately this major upheaval is an <em>opportunity</em>. This is a chance for your company, your teams, and individuals to learn a new skill. Working remotely is a skill. When this is all over, everyone should have a new skill.</p>



<p>Being able to do <em>the same work in a different way</em> is a skill. Being able to take two paths instead of one builds <em>resiliency</em>. Resiliency is a super power. Being more adaptable is valuable.</p>



<p>This is a chance for companies to become more resilient. To build freedom from worry. Freedom from worry that without an office, without those daily meetings, without all that face-to-face that the show can’t go on. Or that it can’t work as well. Get remote right, build this new resiliency, and not only can remote work work, it’ll prove to work <em>better</em> than the way you worked before.</p>


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<h1>How “Good Intent” Undermines Diversity and Inclusion</h1>
<h2><a href="https://thebias.com/2017/09/26/how-good-intent-undermines-diversity-and-inclusion/">Source originale du contenu</a></h2>
<p>A lot of codes of conduct, community guidelines, and company values statements ask people to “assume good intent” when in conflict with other members. Positive statements like this feel more pleasant and welcoming than lists of banned behavior. But asking people to “assume good intent” will actually undermine your code of conduct and make marginalized people feel less welcome and less safe in your community.</p>

<p>A positive rule is still a rule, and it still bans behavior that contradicts it. You need to think carefully about what behaviors your positive expectations are banning, and who those bans will affect. “Assume good intent” is a particularly pernicious positive expectation that will undermine your code of conduct. The implied inverse of this is that <i>not</i> assuming good intent is against the rules.</p>

<p>On its face, that might not sound like a bad idea. After all, isn’t assuming the best in others generally a good way to go through life? What’s the harm in encouraging that within your community?</p>

<p>The harm is that telling people to “assume good intent” is a sign that if they come to you with a concern, you will minimize their feelings, police their reactions, and question their perceptions. It tells marginalized people that you don’t see codes of conduct as tools to address systemic discrimination, but as tools to manage personal conflicts without taking power differences into account. Telling people to “assume good intent” sends a message about whose feelings you plan to center when an issue arises in your community.</p>

<h2>Codes of Conduct Address Systemic Inequities</h2>

<p>Codes of conduct have become standard in geek spaces because people have become more aware of the ways that our spaces are unsafe and unwelcoming to people of color of all genders, women of all races, and other marginalized people. They’re a tool that helps us build safer, more welcoming, and more inclusive spaces. It’s important to keep that goal in mind.</p>

<p>It’s tempting to lead with positivity and encourage a friendly atmosphere, but we don’t end harassment and discrimination just by telling people to be nice. Even someone with no bad intentions can still cause harm if they’re being ignorant or careless. A classic example is stepping on someone’s foot: whether you mean to do it or not doesn’t change the fact that stepping on somebody’s foot hurts.</p>

<p>The strength of this example is that it removes privilege and systemic discrimination from the equation, which makes it much easier for people who don’t understand institutional power to grasp. But trying to explain the impact of racism, sexism, and other forms of systemic discrimination without addressing them as a system is impossible.</p>

<p>Talking about stepping on someone’s foot as a stand-in for micro-aggressions still leaves people confused. Okay, sure, if you step on someone’s foot, you move and apologize–but if it was an accident, then even if it hurt, it doesn’t justify the person cussing you out or shoving you off their foot, right? Shouldn’t civility go both ways? Shouldn’t people assume good intent and ask politely for the other person to move?</p>

<p>So I am not going to ask you to put yourself in the shoes of someone who’s inadvertently stepped on someone’s foot. Instead, I’m going to ask you to imagine that your foot’s been stepped on.</p>

<p>But not just once.</p>

<p>Your foot has been stepped on <i>every single day of your life</i>.</p>

<p>A few people have done it on purpose, but most of the time, it’s been an accident. The people who do it don’t hate you. Most of them don’t even know you. Some of them are your friends. Some of the people who’ve stepped on your foot genuinely love you.</p>

<p>And yet, every day, your foot is getting stepped on. Maybe it’s because of your race, or your gender, or because you’re disabled. Maybe it’s because you’re fat or poor. Maybe all of the above. Point is, people are constantly stepping on you.</p>

<p>You learn to stand back. To yield space to people who might hurt you. To give other people the right of way when walking in crowds, so they won’t walk right into you and <i>BAM</i> bring their heel down on your good dress shoes. You’re constantly being told that you need to watch where you put your feet.</p>

<p>How long, do you think, would you put up with that before you’d start wondering why people are telling you to watch your feet instead of telling the people who step on you to watch theirs? How long would it take you to stop caring whether or not people <i>mean</i> to do it? Because when push comes to stomp, they clearly don’t mean <i>not</i> to do it, or it wouldn’t. keep. happening.</p>

<p>In that context, people telling you to ‘assume good intent’ sounds like they’re really telling you to shut up. That your feelings about getting stomped on all the time don’t matter. That no matter how sore your foot is, how much money you’ve spent replacing ruined shoes, how many times you’ve limped on broken toes, you still have a responsibility to worry about the feelings of the people who are hurting you. Because they don’t <i>mean</i> it. As if that makes a difference.</p>

<p>As a community leader, you don’t want to build spaces where people react calmly to getting their foot stepped on for the millionth time. You want to build spaces where people can trust that they are safe from being stepped on. To do that, you need to address the <i>system</i> of behavior that makes marginalized people feel unwelcome, rather than treating each instance of that behavior as a personal conflict that has occurred in isolation.</p>

<p>This isn’t to say that intent doesn’t matter at all. Certainly if you know a person <i>did</i> mean to violate your code of conduct, it’s appropriate to take that into account when deciding how to respond. You don’t have a quiet word about manners with someone who intentionally used a racial slur; you show them them the door.</p>

<p>But when someone was being careless instead of malicious, their carelessness doesn’t erase the harm. You need to address that harm by centering the <i>victim’s</i> feelings, instead of asking them to center the feelings of the person who hurt them. You need to be sensitive to the fact that the individual incident is part of a larger pattern of behavior they experience, and take steps to keep that pattern of behavior out of your space.</p>

<h2>The False Equivalence of Treating Harassment as Interpersonal Conflict</h2>

<p>Being mindful of systemic inequalities is essential when handling code of conduct concerns. Addressing incidents as if they’re simple conflicts between the parties involved sets up a false equivalence between dealing with discrimination and dealing with the momentary discomfort of being told you hurt someone.</p>

<p>Imagine you’re a community leader. A member of your community, Fred, comes to you and tells you Alicia just cussed him out and he’s upset. You go and talk to Alicia. It turns out, Fred stepped on Alicia’s foot. Alicia, shocked and in pain, shouted “Ow, Fred, <i>what the fuck</i>!?”</p>

<p>Fred insists this wasn’t fair, and Alicia owes him an apology, because he didn’t mean to step on her foot, and she made him feel bad. Your code of conduct says people should “assume good intent,” and Fred is lodging a complaint that Alicia failed to do that. He refuses to apologize for stepping on her foot until she apologizes for cursing.</p>

<p>(Round about now, you might be thinking this is an absurd hypothetical for any community other than a kindergarten classroom. I’ve been consulting on community safety for five years, and friend, I am here to tell you: <i>I’m toning this example</i> way <i>down</i>.)</p>

<p>Back to Alicia and Fred.</p>

<p>Alicia may have a broken toe. Her only pair of dress shoes may be ruined. But the question of whether Fred owes her an apology for this has been completely derailed while you entertain the false equivalence that Alicia dropping an f-bomb has harmed him as much as his negligence harmed her.</p>

<h2>Invalidating Victims’ Feelings</h2>

<p>Worrying about ‘assuming good intent’ when one party has harmed another is centering the feelings of the person who behaved badly, and expecting the person they hurt to center their feelings, too.</p>

<p>Look at the situation between Fred and Alicia. Can you imagine telling Alicia that she and Fred are both in the wrong? Can you imagine telling her that she has a responsibility to consider Fred’s feelings, when Fred is showing no concern for hers?</p>

<p>Telling people to ‘assume good intent’ is telling them that no matter how badly they hurt, they still need to smile and be nice so the person who hurt them won’t feel blamed.</p>

<p>This creates a double standard. Alicia must assume good intent from Fred, even if he stepped on her foot because he was helping himself to her personal space in a way he would never do to another man. But when Alicia reacts out of shock, anger, and pain, the ‘assume good intent’ rule allows Fred to cast that as something Alicia has done <i>at</i> him, rather than seeing it as a very normal human response to being hurt.</p>

<h2>Policing Victims’ Reactions</h2>

<p>Including “assume good intent” in your code of conduct tells victims that they aren’t safe in your space, because if they do anything to make others feel bad about harming them, they will be held accountable for breaking the rules. </p>

<p>In Fred and Alicia’s case, Fred can hide behind “assume good intent” to say that his intentions absolve him of responsibility for hurting Alicia. At the same time, he can demand Alicia take responsibility for making him feel bad. And he can do this no matter how she reacted. Even if she didn’t cuss at him, if he in any way feels blamed or disrespected by how she tells him to get off her foot, he can accuse her of breaking the rules by not ‘assuming good intent.’</p>

<p>“Assume good intent” is frequently brought into codes of conduct to attempt to create a culture of blamelessness, but in reality, it places the question of blame front and center. If Fred didn’t mean any harm, he should be willing to accept responsibility, instead of insisting he’s not to blame. He should understand that your first concern should be making the space safe and welcoming for Alicia and other members of marginalized groups.</p>

<h2>Questioning Victims’ Perceptions</h2>

<p>Marginalized people already know that we’re supposed to “assume good intent” in others. We are told every day that we’re “paranoid,” “overreacting,” or just plain “crazy” if we don’t feel good about being treated badly. This process is called ‘gaslighting,’ and it’s a way of making marginalized people distrust our own perceptions so we won’t object to being mistreated.</p>

<p>In <i>The Gift of Fear</i>, Gavin de Becker talks a lot about instinct, and the way that women develop ‘gut feelings’ about men who are trying to harm them. The central thesis of the book is that women should learn to trust these instincts because they’re based on concrete observations of dangerous behavior. They are a form of pattern recognition that women develop from years of experience. Members of other marginalized groups develop similar forms of pattern recognition to protect themselves from harm, often based on signs so small they can’t consciously describe them.</p>

<p>When you tell people in your community to “assume good intent,” you’re reinforcing the notion that marginalized people shouldn’t trust their instincts.</p>

<p>If Alicia is angry at Fred, it’s not because she’s being vindictive or irrational. Fred has shown Alicia that he thinks his feelings are more important than hers. He thinks Alicia owes it to him to be nice and make him feel good about himself even when he hurt her. He thinks this so strongly that he won’t treat her with basic human decency until she ‘earns it’ by apologizing to him. He has shown Alicia that he thinks it’s okay to harm her if she’s not nice to him.</p>

<p>Fred is dangerous. It would be completely irrational for Alicia to extend him the benefit of the doubt. Forcing her to do so would make your community less safe and inclusive, not more.</p>

<p>Just like it would make your community less safe and inclusive to require that other marginalized members of your community ‘assume good intent’ in those who have demonstrated quite clearly that their intent isn’t good.</p>

<h2>Who Are You Protecting?</h2>

<p>People often reach for positive statements like “assume good intent” because they’re worried about people being “shamed” over innocent mistakes. But society at large is already inclined to assume good intent in people with power and privilege–even when they’re not demonstrating it. If you want to build a culture of “assuming good intent,” start by assuming good intent in marginalized people.</p>

<p>Assume that they already tried being nice. Assume that their feelings are valid. Assume that, after a lifetime of practice, they are responding to harmful behavior in the way that is safest for them. Prioritize that safety over the momentary discomfort people feel when they realize they’ve done something hurtful.</p>

<p>Culture-setting documents like your code of conduct and corporate values should be designed around protecting marginalized people from harmful behavior. Leave out “assume good intent.” Instead, create a culture that recognizes and pushes back against the ways that marginalized people are dehumanized. Expect people to demonstrate their good intent by treating people with respect.</p>
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title: How “Good Intent” Undermines Diversity and Inclusion
url: https://thebias.com/2017/09/26/how-good-intent-undermines-diversity-and-inclusion/
hash_url: 618f913d970fee8feadadd15cf282e5a

<p>A lot of codes of conduct, community guidelines, and company values statements ask people to “assume good intent” when in conflict with other members. Positive statements like this feel more pleasant and welcoming than lists of banned behavior. But asking people to “assume good intent” will actually undermine your code of conduct and make marginalized people feel less welcome and less safe in your community.</p>
<p>A positive rule is still a rule, and it still bans behavior that contradicts it. You need to think carefully about what behaviors your positive expectations are banning, and who those bans will affect. “Assume good intent” is a particularly pernicious positive expectation that will undermine your code of conduct. The implied inverse of this is that <i>not</i> assuming good intent is against the rules.</p>
<p>On its face, that might not sound like a bad idea. After all, isn’t assuming the best in others generally a good way to go through life? What’s the harm in encouraging that within your community?</p>
<p>The harm is that telling people to “assume good intent” is a sign that if they come to you with a concern, you will minimize their feelings, police their reactions, and question their perceptions. It tells marginalized people that you don’t see codes of conduct as tools to address systemic discrimination, but as tools to manage personal conflicts without taking power differences into account. Telling people to “assume good intent” sends a message about whose feelings you plan to center when an issue arises in your community.</p>
<h2>Codes of Conduct Address Systemic Inequities</h2>
<p>Codes of conduct have become standard in geek spaces because people have become more aware of the ways that our spaces are unsafe and unwelcoming to people of color of all genders, women of all races, and other marginalized people. They’re a tool that helps us build safer, more welcoming, and more inclusive spaces. It’s important to keep that goal in mind.</p>
<p>It’s tempting to lead with positivity and encourage a friendly atmosphere, but we don’t end harassment and discrimination just by telling people to be nice. Even someone with no bad intentions can still cause harm if they’re being ignorant or careless. A classic example is stepping on someone’s foot: whether you mean to do it or not doesn’t change the fact that stepping on somebody’s foot hurts.</p>
<p>The strength of this example is that it removes privilege and systemic discrimination from the equation, which makes it much easier for people who don’t understand institutional power to grasp. But trying to explain the impact of racism, sexism, and other forms of systemic discrimination without addressing them as a system is impossible.</p>
<p>Talking about stepping on someone’s foot as a stand-in for micro-aggressions still leaves people confused. Okay, sure, if you step on someone’s foot, you move and apologize–but if it was an accident, then even if it hurt, it doesn’t justify the person cussing you out or shoving you off their foot, right? Shouldn’t civility go both ways? Shouldn’t people assume good intent and ask politely for the other person to move?</p>
<p>So I am not going to ask you to put yourself in the shoes of someone who’s inadvertently stepped on someone’s foot. Instead, I’m going to ask you to imagine that your foot’s been stepped on.</p>
<p>But not just once.</p>
<p>Your foot has been stepped on <i>every single day of your life</i>.</p>
<p>A few people have done it on purpose, but most of the time, it’s been an accident. The people who do it don’t hate you. Most of them don’t even know you. Some of them are your friends. Some of the people who’ve stepped on your foot genuinely love you.</p>
<p>And yet, every day, your foot is getting stepped on. Maybe it’s because of your race, or your gender, or because you’re disabled. Maybe it’s because you’re fat or poor. Maybe all of the above. Point is, people are constantly stepping on you.</p>
<p>You learn to stand back. To yield space to people who might hurt you. To give other people the right of way when walking in crowds, so they won’t walk right into you and <i>BAM</i> bring their heel down on your good dress shoes. You’re constantly being told that you need to watch where you put your feet.</p>
<p>How long, do you think, would you put up with that before you’d start wondering why people are telling you to watch your feet instead of telling the people who step on you to watch theirs? How long would it take you to stop caring whether or not people <i>mean</i> to do it? Because when push comes to stomp, they clearly don’t mean <i>not</i> to do it, or it wouldn’t. keep. happening.</p>
<p>In that context, people telling you to ‘assume good intent’ sounds like they’re really telling you to shut up. That your feelings about getting stomped on all the time don’t matter. That no matter how sore your foot is, how much money you’ve spent replacing ruined shoes, how many times you’ve limped on broken toes, you still have a responsibility to worry about the feelings of the people who are hurting you. Because they don’t <i>mean</i> it. As if that makes a difference.</p>
<p>As a community leader, you don’t want to build spaces where people react calmly to getting their foot stepped on for the millionth time. You want to build spaces where people can trust that they are safe from being stepped on. To do that, you need to address the <i>system</i> of behavior that makes marginalized people feel unwelcome, rather than treating each instance of that behavior as a personal conflict that has occurred in isolation.</p>
<p>This isn’t to say that intent doesn’t matter at all. Certainly if you know a person <i>did</i> mean to violate your code of conduct, it’s appropriate to take that into account when deciding how to respond. You don’t have a quiet word about manners with someone who intentionally used a racial slur; you show them them the door.</p>
<p>But when someone was being careless instead of malicious, their carelessness doesn’t erase the harm. You need to address that harm by centering the <i>victim’s</i> feelings, instead of asking them to center the feelings of the person who hurt them. You need to be sensitive to the fact that the individual incident is part of a larger pattern of behavior they experience, and take steps to keep that pattern of behavior out of your space.</p>
<h2>The False Equivalence of Treating Harassment as Interpersonal Conflict</h2>
<p>Being mindful of systemic inequalities is essential when handling code of conduct concerns. Addressing incidents as if they’re simple conflicts between the parties involved sets up a false equivalence between dealing with discrimination and dealing with the momentary discomfort of being told you hurt someone.</p>
<p>Imagine you’re a community leader. A member of your community, Fred, comes to you and tells you Alicia just cussed him out and he’s upset. You go and talk to Alicia. It turns out, Fred stepped on Alicia’s foot. Alicia, shocked and in pain, shouted “Ow, Fred, <i>what the fuck</i>!?”</p>
<p>Fred insists this wasn’t fair, and Alicia owes him an apology, because he didn’t mean to step on her foot, and she made him feel bad. Your code of conduct says people should “assume good intent,” and Fred is lodging a complaint that Alicia failed to do that. He refuses to apologize for stepping on her foot until she apologizes for cursing.</p>
<p>(Round about now, you might be thinking this is an absurd hypothetical for any community other than a kindergarten classroom. I’ve been consulting on community safety for five years, and friend, I am here to tell you: <i>I’m toning this example</i> way <i>down</i>.)</p>
<p>Back to Alicia and Fred.</p>
<p>Alicia may have a broken toe. Her only pair of dress shoes may be ruined. But the question of whether Fred owes her an apology for this has been completely derailed while you entertain the false equivalence that Alicia dropping an f-bomb has harmed him as much as his negligence harmed her.</p>
<h2>Invalidating Victims’ Feelings</h2>
<p>Worrying about ‘assuming good intent’ when one party has harmed another is centering the feelings of the person who behaved badly, and expecting the person they hurt to center their feelings, too.</p>
<p>Look at the situation between Fred and Alicia. Can you imagine telling Alicia that she and Fred are both in the wrong? Can you imagine telling her that she has a responsibility to consider Fred’s feelings, when Fred is showing no concern for hers?</p>
<p>Telling people to ‘assume good intent’ is telling them that no matter how badly they hurt, they still need to smile and be nice so the person who hurt them won’t feel blamed.</p>
<p>This creates a double standard. Alicia must assume good intent from Fred, even if he stepped on her foot because he was helping himself to her personal space in a way he would never do to another man. But when Alicia reacts out of shock, anger, and pain, the ‘assume good intent’ rule allows Fred to cast that as something Alicia has done <i>at</i> him, rather than seeing it as a very normal human response to being hurt.</p>
<h2>Policing Victims’ Reactions</h2>
<p>Including “assume good intent” in your code of conduct tells victims that they aren’t safe in your space, because if they do anything to make others feel bad about harming them, they will be held accountable for breaking the rules. </p>
<p>In Fred and Alicia’s case, Fred can hide behind “assume good intent” to say that his intentions absolve him of responsibility for hurting Alicia. At the same time, he can demand Alicia take responsibility for making him feel bad. And he can do this no matter how she reacted. Even if she didn’t cuss at him, if he in any way feels blamed or disrespected by how she tells him to get off her foot, he can accuse her of breaking the rules by not ‘assuming good intent.’</p>
<p>“Assume good intent” is frequently brought into codes of conduct to attempt to create a culture of blamelessness, but in reality, it places the question of blame front and center. If Fred didn’t mean any harm, he should be willing to accept responsibility, instead of insisting he’s not to blame. He should understand that your first concern should be making the space safe and welcoming for Alicia and other members of marginalized groups.</p>
<h2>Questioning Victims’ Perceptions</h2>
<p>Marginalized people already know that we’re supposed to “assume good intent” in others. We are told every day that we’re “paranoid,” “overreacting,” or just plain “crazy” if we don’t feel good about being treated badly. This process is called ‘gaslighting,’ and it’s a way of making marginalized people distrust our own perceptions so we won’t object to being mistreated.</p>
<p>In <i>The Gift of Fear</i>, Gavin de Becker talks a lot about instinct, and the way that women develop ‘gut feelings’ about men who are trying to harm them. The central thesis of the book is that women should learn to trust these instincts because they’re based on concrete observations of dangerous behavior. They are a form of pattern recognition that women develop from years of experience. Members of other marginalized groups develop similar forms of pattern recognition to protect themselves from harm, often based on signs so small they can’t consciously describe them.</p>
<p>When you tell people in your community to “assume good intent,” you’re reinforcing the notion that marginalized people shouldn’t trust their instincts.</p>
<p>If Alicia is angry at Fred, it’s not because she’s being vindictive or irrational. Fred has shown Alicia that he thinks his feelings are more important than hers. He thinks Alicia owes it to him to be nice and make him feel good about himself even when he hurt her. He thinks this so strongly that he won’t treat her with basic human decency until she ‘earns it’ by apologizing to him. He has shown Alicia that he thinks it’s okay to harm her if she’s not nice to him.</p>
<p>Fred is dangerous. It would be completely irrational for Alicia to extend him the benefit of the doubt. Forcing her to do so would make your community less safe and inclusive, not more.</p>
<p>Just like it would make your community less safe and inclusive to require that other marginalized members of your community ‘assume good intent’ in those who have demonstrated quite clearly that their intent isn’t good.</p>
<h2>Who Are You Protecting?</h2>
<p>People often reach for positive statements like “assume good intent” because they’re worried about people being “shamed” over innocent mistakes. But society at large is already inclined to assume good intent in people with power and privilege–even when they’re not demonstrating it. If you want to build a culture of “assuming good intent,” start by assuming good intent in marginalized people.</p>
<p>Assume that they already tried being nice. Assume that their feelings are valid. Assume that, after a lifetime of practice, they are responding to harmful behavior in the way that is safest for them. Prioritize that safety over the momentary discomfort people feel when they realize they’ve done something hurtful.</p>
<p>Culture-setting documents like your code of conduct and corporate values should be designed around protecting marginalized people from harmful behavior. Leave out “assume good intent.” Instead, create a culture that recognizes and pushes back against the ways that marginalized people are dehumanized. Expect people to demonstrate their good intent by treating people with respect.</p>

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<h1>Minimum</h1>
<h2><a href="https://journal.loupbrun.ca/n/021/">Source originale du contenu</a></h2>
<blockquote><p>Le Minimum <del>pourrait être défini comme la perfection atteinte par un artefact lorsqu’il ne peut plus être amélioré par soustraction. C’est la qualité que possède un objet lorsque chaque composante, chaque détail, et chaque jointure a été réduit ou condensé à l’essentiel. Il</del> résulte de l’omission de l’inessentiel.</p><p>— John Pawson<sup id="fnref:1"/></p></blockquote>
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<blockquote><p>Le Minimum <del>pourrait être défini comme la perfection atteinte par un artefact lorsqu’il ne peut plus être amélioré par soustraction. C’est la qualité que possède un objet lorsque chaque composante, chaque détail, et chaque jointure a été réduit ou condensé à l’essentiel. Il</del> résulte de l’omission de l’inessentiel.</p><p>— John Pawson<sup id="fnref:1"/></p></blockquote>

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<article>
<h1>Épuiser la pratique</h1>
<h2><a href="https://www.quaternum.net/2020/02/29/epuiser-la-pratique/">Source originale du contenu</a></h2>
<p>Un accident artistique.</p>

<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-01.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p>L’idée était venue presque par hasard.
Profiter de deux mois dans une autre ville pour produire quelque chose.
Avec une contrainte à s’imposer, et une certaine dimension de régularité.
Le carnet comme support.
Même si l’exploration de l’intime est souvent attirante l’écriture n’était pas une option viable à ce moment-là.
Apprendre à dessiner.
En deux mois
Chaque jour.
Projet saugrenu dont il était facile de se détacher, au besoin.</p>

<p>L’expérience passe vite.
Dans la douleur et dans la satisfaction.
Les progrès sont rapides, le style s’affirme vite, le résultat est palpable.
Montrable aussi.
Pourquoi ne pas continuer, comme une opportunité de créer, avec de maigres moyens mais un horizon flamboyant.
Transcrire un bâtiment, proposer un cadrage, rendre compte de la ville, capter les détails, garder une trace.
Dessiner dehors, s’appuyer sur le regard.
L’atelier est le carnet.
Dessiner sur une table est exclu.</p>

<p>Dessiner au moins une fois par jour, remplir le carnet, chercher le trait juste.
La répétition comme moyen d’aboutir à un moment de félicité : un geste graphique et artistique remarquable, sinon parfait.
Parfois quelques détours, comme ajouter de la couleur, modifier le rythme du trait, changer de format, trouver une autre technique, mais toujours créer dans un geste continu, sans casser l’intention.
Pas de crayonné, mais un trait noir indélébile.
Pas de feuille volante, mais un carnet dont les pages sont reliées.
Garder la rature si elle advient, conserver les ébauches, archiver les échecs.
Tout ça, mélangé.</p>

<p>Forcément ça implique d’investir sa personne.
Marcher longtemps avant de trouver le détail qui attire l’œil, ou le modèle qui sera reproductible.
Et le corps dans tout ça : rester assis presque une heure dans une position inconfortable, négocier avec le froid l’hiver, et parfois entrer en conflit.
Accroupi près d’une usine, ça surprend.
Pas d’intérêt pour le tracteur autre que sa représentation.
Quelques points de suture après avoir dessiné une carcasse de voiture derrière un camp de fortune.
Non il n’était pas question de voler des enfants, juste dessiner.
Et les nombreuses sollicitations qui se veulent bienveillantes.
C’est joli, c’est beau.
Pourtant le dessin pour le dessin, être son propre lecteur.
Le reste est autre chose, possible, mais autre chose.</p>

<p>Se satisfaire de feuilleter les pages noircies.
Grimacer souvent, prendre du plaisir à voir les dessins se suivre.
Les bons comme les moins bons.
Être le premier à constater que quelque chose se passe.
Être le créateur, le spectateur, le critique.
Fabriquer un livre à édition limitée, le seul exemplaire disponible.
Maîtriser cette chaîne de la création.
Et pourtant.
Parfois.
Dévoiler aux proches l’achèvement, quand tout est figé et seulement bon à montrer.
Alors qu’au creux de soi le geste n’en finit plus.
Il y a toujours un dessin à inscrire dans le carnet.
Toujours un immeuble à dessiner, une usine à représenter, un panneau tordu à conserver.</p>

<p>Les carnets se suivent, se multiplient.
Dessiner n’est pas vital, dessiner était une contrainte et devient une obligation.
Peut-être par nécessité de produire, quel que soit le résultat et sa qualité.
Un dessin raté c’est mieux que pas de dessin.
Avec tous ces carnets il est possible de constater l’ampleur de la tâche.
De mesurer l’effort, le temps passé, la réussite, l’évolution, la chute.
Le dessin est-il là pour autre chose ?
Passer des heures à traverser une ville, à se perdre dans ses recoins ?
Être le touriste de son propre quotidien atteint vite une limite.
La discipline devient pesante.</p>

<p>La création en voyage est un moyen, pas une fin.
Ne pas tomber dans les clichés des vues attendues.
Ça aurait pu être au coin de la rue, mais ce fut dans cette capitale européenne facile à dessiner.
Ne pas rendre reconnaissable ce bâtiment.
Proposer une autre interprétation, jouer avec les préjugés.
Les carnets deviennent des boussoles.
Là, à ce moment, il s’est passé autre chose que le dessin.
Les amis, les amours, les sentiments, les émotions.
À côté, autour, dedans.
Plus dedans que ce qui était prévu.</p>

<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-03.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p>C’est un univers qui prend forme.
Plus seulement les pages remplies ou la tentation de la perfection.
Noter les signaux faibles.
De ceux qui sont d’habitude écartés.
Plutôt que de regarder les photos pour se souvenir, feuilleter les carnets.
La maîtrise est une supercherie.
C’est le stylo qui tient tout, qui dirige.
Chaque périple est anticipé dans l’objectif d’une nouvelle création.
À l’occasion d’un déplacement trouver quelques heures pour s’échapper.
Se plaindre des jours de pluie.
Attendre le printemps.
Guetter les prochains voyages.</p>

<p>L’anticipation de la création devient pollution, ça prend toute la place.
Partir à la chasse au dessin.
Le pas lourd, la main hésitante.
Les dessins se font plus rares.
C’était pourtant un moyen de se retrouver.
Une ascèse vers l’extérieur, une retraite à l’intérieur du monde, un <em>break</em>.
D’autres pratiques pointent.
Tester l’écriture, le journal.
La pire contrainte, abandonnée plus tard.
Le texte fait son chemin.
Aussi froid que le dessin d’observation.
Rien dire de soi, en apparence.</p>

<p>Le dessin brûlait les doigts d’excitation.
Il est devenu un poids, une charge mentale.
Quelque chose s’est usé en chemin.
La recette devenait trop prévisible, le résultat moins aléatoire.
Les ratures rares.
Celles qui subsistent ont comme origine l’hésitation, pas la tentative.
Est-ce que c’est triste ?
Regrettable ?
Dommage ?</p>

<p>Ça se passerait ailleurs.
Si tant est que la création soit une quantité d’énergie disponible.
Alors allons voir ailleurs plutôt que rien du tout.
Hésiter, c’est vraiment rater.
L’échec est un bel essai.
Il faut négocier avec l’univers créé.
Celui-ci n’est pas détaché du reste.
S’il y a un reste.
Tout se réagençait déjà.
Les carnets cachaient les métamorphoses à l’œuvre.
L’urgence de s’écouter.</p>

<p>Le dessin n’est pas un vieux copain.
Il n’y a pas eu d’amitié.
Une porte ouverte, d’autre couloirs empruntés.
Regretter c’est croire que le chemin est balisé.
Tout le monde est perdu mais personne ne le sait.
Les carnets étaient une boussole.
Il y a en d’autres, des boussoles.
Aussi des phares, des lumières dans la nuit.
Tout se superpose, s’entrechoque.
C’est beau.</p>

<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-02.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p><em>Texte de création rédigé dans le cadre du séminaire de Jean-Simon Desrochers, Département des littératures de langues française, Université de Montréal, novembre 2019.</em></p>
</article>


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+ 150
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cache/2020/fd776407232cd6fd7627bac7dba39755/index.md View File

@@ -0,0 +1,150 @@
title: Épuiser la pratique
url: https://www.quaternum.net/2020/02/29/epuiser-la-pratique/
hash_url: fd776407232cd6fd7627bac7dba39755

<p>Un accident artistique.</p>



<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-01.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p>L’idée était venue presque par hasard.
Profiter de deux mois dans une autre ville pour produire quelque chose.
Avec une contrainte à s’imposer, et une certaine dimension de régularité.
Le carnet comme support.
Même si l’exploration de l’intime est souvent attirante l’écriture n’était pas une option viable à ce moment-là.
Apprendre à dessiner.
En deux mois
Chaque jour.
Projet saugrenu dont il était facile de se détacher, au besoin.</p>

<p>L’expérience passe vite.
Dans la douleur et dans la satisfaction.
Les progrès sont rapides, le style s’affirme vite, le résultat est palpable.
Montrable aussi.
Pourquoi ne pas continuer, comme une opportunité de créer, avec de maigres moyens mais un horizon flamboyant.
Transcrire un bâtiment, proposer un cadrage, rendre compte de la ville, capter les détails, garder une trace.
Dessiner dehors, s’appuyer sur le regard.
L’atelier est le carnet.
Dessiner sur une table est exclu.</p>

<p>Dessiner au moins une fois par jour, remplir le carnet, chercher le trait juste.
La répétition comme moyen d’aboutir à un moment de félicité : un geste graphique et artistique remarquable, sinon parfait.
Parfois quelques détours, comme ajouter de la couleur, modifier le rythme du trait, changer de format, trouver une autre technique, mais toujours créer dans un geste continu, sans casser l’intention.
Pas de crayonné, mais un trait noir indélébile.
Pas de feuille volante, mais un carnet dont les pages sont reliées.
Garder la rature si elle advient, conserver les ébauches, archiver les échecs.
Tout ça, mélangé.</p>

<p>Forcément ça implique d’investir sa personne.
Marcher longtemps avant de trouver le détail qui attire l’œil, ou le modèle qui sera reproductible.
Et le corps dans tout ça : rester assis presque une heure dans une position inconfortable, négocier avec le froid l’hiver, et parfois entrer en conflit.
Accroupi près d’une usine, ça surprend.
Pas d’intérêt pour le tracteur autre que sa représentation.
Quelques points de suture après avoir dessiné une carcasse de voiture derrière un camp de fortune.
Non il n’était pas question de voler des enfants, juste dessiner.
Et les nombreuses sollicitations qui se veulent bienveillantes.
C’est joli, c’est beau.
Pourtant le dessin pour le dessin, être son propre lecteur.
Le reste est autre chose, possible, mais autre chose.</p>

<p>Se satisfaire de feuilleter les pages noircies.
Grimacer souvent, prendre du plaisir à voir les dessins se suivre.
Les bons comme les moins bons.
Être le premier à constater que quelque chose se passe.
Être le créateur, le spectateur, le critique.
Fabriquer un livre à édition limitée, le seul exemplaire disponible.
Maîtriser cette chaîne de la création.
Et pourtant.
Parfois.
Dévoiler aux proches l’achèvement, quand tout est figé et seulement bon à montrer.
Alors qu’au creux de soi le geste n’en finit plus.
Il y a toujours un dessin à inscrire dans le carnet.
Toujours un immeuble à dessiner, une usine à représenter, un panneau tordu à conserver.</p>

<p>Les carnets se suivent, se multiplient.
Dessiner n’est pas vital, dessiner était une contrainte et devient une obligation.
Peut-être par nécessité de produire, quel que soit le résultat et sa qualité.
Un dessin raté c’est mieux que pas de dessin.
Avec tous ces carnets il est possible de constater l’ampleur de la tâche.
De mesurer l’effort, le temps passé, la réussite, l’évolution, la chute.
Le dessin est-il là pour autre chose ?
Passer des heures à traverser une ville, à se perdre dans ses recoins ?
Être le touriste de son propre quotidien atteint vite une limite.
La discipline devient pesante.</p>

<p>La création en voyage est un moyen, pas une fin.
Ne pas tomber dans les clichés des vues attendues.
Ça aurait pu être au coin de la rue, mais ce fut dans cette capitale européenne facile à dessiner.
Ne pas rendre reconnaissable ce bâtiment.
Proposer une autre interprétation, jouer avec les préjugés.
Les carnets deviennent des boussoles.
Là, à ce moment, il s’est passé autre chose que le dessin.
Les amis, les amours, les sentiments, les émotions.
À côté, autour, dedans.
Plus dedans que ce qui était prévu.</p>

<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-03.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p>C’est un univers qui prend forme.
Plus seulement les pages remplies ou la tentation de la perfection.
Noter les signaux faibles.
De ceux qui sont d’habitude écartés.
Plutôt que de regarder les photos pour se souvenir, feuilleter les carnets.
La maîtrise est une supercherie.
C’est le stylo qui tient tout, qui dirige.
Chaque périple est anticipé dans l’objectif d’une nouvelle création.
À l’occasion d’un déplacement trouver quelques heures pour s’échapper.
Se plaindre des jours de pluie.
Attendre le printemps.
Guetter les prochains voyages.</p>

<p>L’anticipation de la création devient pollution, ça prend toute la place.
Partir à la chasse au dessin.
Le pas lourd, la main hésitante.
Les dessins se font plus rares.
C’était pourtant un moyen de se retrouver.
Une ascèse vers l’extérieur, une retraite à l’intérieur du monde, un <em>break</em>.
D’autres pratiques pointent.
Tester l’écriture, le journal.
La pire contrainte, abandonnée plus tard.
Le texte fait son chemin.
Aussi froid que le dessin d’observation.
Rien dire de soi, en apparence.</p>

<p>Le dessin brûlait les doigts d’excitation.
Il est devenu un poids, une charge mentale.
Quelque chose s’est usé en chemin.
La recette devenait trop prévisible, le résultat moins aléatoire.
Les ratures rares.
Celles qui subsistent ont comme origine l’hésitation, pas la tentative.
Est-ce que c’est triste ?
Regrettable ?
Dommage ?</p>

<p>Ça se passerait ailleurs.
Si tant est que la création soit une quantité d’énergie disponible.
Alors allons voir ailleurs plutôt que rien du tout.
Hésiter, c’est vraiment rater.
L’échec est un bel essai.
Il faut négocier avec l’univers créé.
Celui-ci n’est pas détaché du reste.
S’il y a un reste.
Tout se réagençait déjà.
Les carnets cachaient les métamorphoses à l’œuvre.
L’urgence de s’écouter.</p>

<p>Le dessin n’est pas un vieux copain.
Il n’y a pas eu d’amitié.
Une porte ouverte, d’autre couloirs empruntés.
Regretter c’est croire que le chemin est balisé.
Tout le monde est perdu mais personne ne le sait.
Les carnets étaient une boussole.
Il y a en d’autres, des boussoles.
Aussi des phares, des lumières dans la nuit.
Tout se superpose, s’entrechoque.
C’est beau.</p>

<p><img src="https://www.quaternum.net/images/2019-epuiser-02.jpg" alt=""/></p>

<p><em>Texte de création rédigé dans le cadre du séminaire de Jean-Simon Desrochers, Département des littératures de langues française, Université de Montréal, novembre 2019.</em></p>

+ 10
- 0
cache/2020/index.html View File

@@ -59,6 +59,8 @@
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@@ -87,6 +89,8 @@
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